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Coronavirus Health Order/Orden de Salud sobre Coronavirus

WHAT IS OPEN IN CONTRA COSTA? UPDATED 1/25/2021

READ MORE ON THE NEW REGIONAL STAY AT HOME ORDER (12/03/2020)

Regional Stay Home Order – NEW

The Regional Stay Home Order (PDF), announced December 3, 2020, and a supplemental order, signed December 6, 2020, will go into effect at 11:59 PM the day after a region has been announced to have less than 15% ICU availability. The supplemental order clarifies retail operations and goes into effect immediately. They prohibit private gatherings of any size, close sector operations except for critical infrastructure and retail, and require 100% masking (with certain exceptions as indicated within guidance for use of face coverings) and physical distancing in all others.
Once triggered, these orders will remain in effect for at least 3 weeks. After that period, they will be lifted when a region’s projected ICU capacity meets or exceeds 15%. This will be assessed on a weekly basis after the initial 3 week period. 

Learn more about these orders and find out what’s open in your area.

Regions

The state released a map of the five regions being measured. When a region first falls below 15% ICU bed availability, the Regional Stay Home Order goes into effect there the next evening at 11:59 PM.

  • Northern California: Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity
  • Bay Area: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma
  • Greater Sacramento: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba
  • San Joaquin Valley: Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Benito, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne
  • Southern California: Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura

Limited Stay Home Order

On December 21, 2020, a Supplement to the Limited Stay Home Order was signed. The supplement extended the Limited Stay Home Order until such time as the Regional Stay Home Order has terminated in all Regions in the State of California. In addition to applying to the counties in the Widespread (purple) of the Blueprint for a Safer Economy, the Limited Stay Home Order also now applies in counties under Regional Stay Home Order. It directs that non-essential retail must cease between 10:00pm PST and 5:00am PST.

 

En Espanol

Orden regional de permanecer en casa, NUEVA

La orden regional de permanecer en casa (PDF), anunciada el 3 de diciembre de 2020 y una orden complementaria, firmada el 6 de diciembre de 2020, entrarán en vigor a las 11:59 p. m. del día siguiente a cuando se anuncie que una región tiene menos del 15 % de disponibilidad en las unidades de cuidados intensivos (Intensive Care Unit, ICU). La orden complementaria aclara las operaciones minoristas y entra en vigor de inmediato. Ambas prohíben las reuniones privadas de cualquier tamaño, cierran las operaciones de sectores, excepto la infraestructura crítica y el comercio minorista, y exigen el 100 % de uso de mascarilla (con ciertas excepciones indicadas en la guía para el uso de cubiertas faciales) y distanciamiento físico en todos los demás.
Una vez activadas, estas órdenes permanecerán en vigor al menos 3 semanas. Después de ese periodo, se levantarán cuando la capacidad proyectada de las ICU de una región alcance o exceda el 15 %. Esta será evaluada semanalmente después del periodo inicial de 3 semanas. 

Obtenga más información sobre estas órdenes y averigüe qué está abierto en su área.

Regiones

El estado publicó un mapa de las cinco regiones que están siendo medidas. Cuando la disponibilidad de camas en las ICU de una región cae por primera vez debajo del 15 %, la orden regional de permanecer en casa entra en vigor en dicha región la noche siguiente a las 11:59 p. m.

  • Norte de California: Del Norte, Glenn, Humboldt, Lake, Lassen, Mendocino, Modoc, Shasta, Siskiyou, Tehama, Trinity
  • Área de la bahía: Alameda, Contra Costa, Marin, Monterey, Napa, San Francisco, San Mateo, Santa Clara, Santa Cruz, Solano, Sonoma
  • Área metropolitana de Sacramento: Alpine, Amador, Butte, Colusa, El Dorado, Nevada, Placer, Plumas, Sacramento, Sierra, Sutter, Yolo, Yuba
  • Valle de San Joaquín: Calaveras, Fresno, Kern, Kings, Madera, Mariposa, Merced, San Benito, San Joaquin, Stanislaus, Tulare, Tuolumne
  • Sur de California: Imperial, Inyo, Los Angeles, Mono, Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, Ventura

Orden limitada de permanecer en casa:

El 21 de diciembre de 2020 se firmó un suplemento a la orden limitada de permanecer en casa. El suplemento extendió la orden limitada de permanecer en casa hasta el momento en el que la orden regional de permanecer en casa haya terminado en todas las regiones del estado de California. Además de aplicarse a los condados que se encuentren en el nivel Extendido (morado) del Plan para una economía más segura, la orden limitada de permanecer en casa ahora también se aplica en los condados que se encuentran bajo la orden regional de permanecer en casa. Esta indica que la venta minorista no esencial debe cesar entre las 10:00 p. m. y las 5:00 a. m., hora del pacífico (PDT).

 

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Coronavirus Disease 2019 (COVID-19) Update

LMCHD is working cooperatively with the State of California and the Association of Health Care Districts to respond to the spread of the respiratory illness caused by a coronavirus (COVID-19) 

Here’s what residents living within LMCHD’s boundaries should know:

How can people protect themselves?

According to the State of CA, the best way to prevent illness is to avoid being exposed to this virus. The virus is thought to spread mainly from person-to-person between people who are in close contact with one another (within about 6 feet). This occurs through respiratory droplets produced when an infected person coughs or sneezes. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. Older adults and people who have severe underlying chronic medical conditions like heart or lung disease or diabetes seem to be at higher risk for developing more serious complications from COVID-19 illness. Every person has a role to play. So much of protecting yourself and your family comes down to common sense:

  • Washing hands with soap and water.
  • Clean and disinfect frequently touched surfaces daily. If surfaces are dirty, clean them using detergent or soap and water prior to disinfection.
  •  Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Cover your cough or sneeze with a tissue or your elbow.
  • Avoiding close contact with people who are sick.
  • Staying away from work, school or other people if you become sick with respiratory symptoms like fever and cough.
  • Following guidance from public health officials.

Please consult with your health care provider about additional steps you may be able to take to protect yourself.

Who is at Higher Risk for Serious Illness from COVID-19?

Early information out of China, where COVID-19 first started, shows that some people are at higher risk of getting very sick from this illness. This includes:

  • Older adults
  • Individuals with compromised immune systems
  • Individuals who have serious chronic medical conditions like:Heart diseaseDiabetesLung disease

If you are at higher risk for serious illness from COVID-19 because of your age or health condition, it is important for you to take actions to reduce your risk of getting sick with the disease, including:

  • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, or having been in a public place.
  • Avoid touching eyes, nose or mouth with unwashed hands.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick and stay away from large gatherings and crowds.
  • Stay home as much as possible. Consider ways of getting food brought to your house through family, social, or commercial networks.

It is also important that you listen to public health officials who may recommend community actions to reduce potential exposure to COVID-19, especially if COVID-19 is spreading in your community.

For more information visit the CDC's website.

What should you do if you think you're sick?

Call ahead: If you are experiencing symptoms of COVID-19, and may have had contact with a person with COVID-19 or recently traveled to countries with apparent community spread, call your health care provider or local public health department first before seeking medical care so that appropriate precautions can be taken.

What is Novel Coronavirus (COVID-19)?

Coronaviruses are a large group of viruses that are common among animals and humans. This novel coronavirus that causes COVID-19 is a newly discovered coronavirus that has not been previously detected in animals or humans. The source of this virus is not yet known.

What are the symptoms of COVID-19?

Typically, human coronaviruses cause mild-to-moderate respiratory illness. Symptoms are very similar to the flu, including:

  • Fever
  • Cough
  • Shortness of breath

COVID-19 can cause more severe respiratory illness.

What is the treatment for COVID-19?

From the international data we have, of those who have tested positive for COVID-19, approximately 80 percent do not exhibit symptoms that would require hospitalization. For patients who are more severely ill, hospitals can provide supportive care. We are continuing to learn more about this novel coronavirus and treatment may change over time.

How is it decided whether a person with a confirmed case of COVID-19 can self-isolate at home or must be confined to a hospital or elsewhere?

Local health departments are working in partnership with the California Department of Public Health and the CDC, and making determinations on whether a person ill with COVID-19 requires hospitalization or if home isolation is appropriate. That decision may be based on multiple factors including the severity of illness, need for testing, and appropriateness of home for isolation purposes.

What is the difference between COVID-19 and other coronaviruses?

Coronaviruses are a large family of viruses. There are some coronaviruses that commonly circulate in humans. These viruses cause mild to moderate respiratory illness, although rarely they can cause severe disease. COVID-19 is closely related to two other animal coronaviruses that have caused outbreaks in people—the SARS coronavirus and the MERS (middle east respiratory syndrome) coronavirus.

Is California able to test for COVID-19?

Eighteen public health labs in California are testing for COVID-19. These labs include the California Department of Public Health's Laboratory in Richmond, Alameda, Contra Costa, Humboldt, Los Angeles, Monterey, Napa-Solano-Yolo-Marin (located in Solano), Orange, Sacramento, San Bernardino, San Diego, San Francisco, San Luis Obispo, Santa Clara, Shasta, Sonoma, Tulare, and Ventura County public health laboratories. The Richmond Laboratory will provide diagnostic testing within 48-hour turnaround time. More public health labs will soon be able to test for COVID-19. This means California public health officials will get test results sooner so that patients will get the best care.

Should public events be canceled?

The California Department of Public Health has determined that gatherings should be postponed or canceled across the state until at least the end of March. Non-essential gatherings must be limited to no more than 250 people, while smaller events can proceed only if the organizers can implement social distancing of 6 feet per person. Gatherings of individuals who are at higher risk for severe illness from COVID-19 should be limited to no more than 10 people, while also following social distancing guidelines.

What is Social Distancing?

Social distancing is a practice recommended by public health officials to stop or slow down the spread of contagious diseases. It requires the creation of physical space between individuals who may spread certain infectious diseases. The key is to minimize the number of gatherings as much as possible and to achieve space between individuals when events or activities cannot be modified, postponed, or canceled. Although the Department of Public Health expects most events with more than 250 attendees to be postponed or canceled, we emphasize that the venue space does matter. Achieving space between individuals of approximately six feet is advisable. Additionally, there is a focus on creating space between individuals who have come together on a one-time or rare basis and who have very different travel patterns such as those coming from multiple countries, states or counties.

Should I wear a mask?

The California Department of Public Health, along with the CDC, does not recommend that healthy people wear masks currently. However, masks are recommended to limit the spread of disease for people who are exhibiting respiratory symptoms.

What if I have symptoms?

Patient: If a person develops symptoms of COVID-19 including fever, cough or shortness of breath, and has reason to believe they may have been exposed, they should call their health care provider or Contra Costa County Health Services before seeking care. Contacting them in advance will make sure that people can get the care they need without putting others at risk. Please be sure to tell your health care provider about your travel history. You can also take the following precautionary measures: avoid contact with sick individuals, wash hands often with soap and warm water for at least 20 seconds.

What should I do if I am unable to work after being exposed to COVID-19?

Individuals who are unable to work due to having or being exposed to COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Disability Insurance (DI) claim.

Disability Insurance provides short-term benefit payments to eligible workers who have full or partial loss of wages due to a non-work-related illness, injury, or pregnancy. Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50 - $1,300 a week.

Californians who are unable to work because they are caring for an ill or quarantined family member with COVID-19 (certified by a medical professional) can file a Paid Family Leave (PFL) claim.

Paid Family Leave provides up to six weeks of benefit payments to eligible workers who have a full or partial loss of wages because they need time off work to care for a seriously ill family member or to bond with a new child. Benefit amounts are approximately 60-70 percent of wages (depending on income) and range from $50-$1,300 a week.

For more information related to resources for California's Employers and Workers, please visit this Labor and Workforce Development Agency webpage.

How is the State working with local partners to protect our health?

California has been actively and extensively planning with our local public health and health care delivery systems. Here are some of the things we are already doing: 

·         As in any public health event, the California Department of Public Health's Medical and Health Coordination Center has been activated and is coordinating public health response efforts across the state.

·         California continues to prepare and respond in coordination with federal and local partners, hospitals and physicians.

  • Governor Newsom declared a State of Emergency to make additional resources available, formalize emergency actions already underway across multiple state agencies and departments, and help the state prepare for a broader spread of COVID-19.
  • Governor Gavin Newsom requested the Legislature make up to $20 million available for the state government to respond to the spread of COVID-19.
  • California activated the State Operations Center to its highest level to coordinate response efforts across the state.
  • 24 million more Californians are now eligible for free medically necessary COVID-19 testing.
  • California made available some of its emergency planning reserves of 21 million N95 filtering facepiece masks for use in certain health care settings to ease shortages of personal protective equipment.
  • The Public Health Department is providing information, guidance documents, and technical support to local health departments, health care facilities, providers, schools, universities, colleges, and childcare facilities across California
  • The California Employee Development Department (EDD) is encouraging individuals who are unable to work due to exposure to COVID-19 to file a Disability Insurance claim.
  • EDD is also encouraging employers who are experiencing a slowdown in their businesses or services as a result of the Coronavirus impact on the economy to apply for an Unemployment Insurance work-sharing program.
  • The Public Health Department is coordinating with federal authorities and local health departments that have implemented screening, monitoring and, in some cases quarantine of returning travelers.
  • In coordination with the CDC, state and local health departments, we are actively responding to cases of COVID-19.
  • The Public Health Department is supporting hospitals and local public health laboratories in the collection of specimens and testing for COVID-19.

Eighteen public health labs in California, including the Department of Public Health's state laboratory in Richmond, is now testing for the virus that causes COVID-19.

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